Monday, May 8, 2017

Effects of traumatic dental injuries to primary teeth on permanent teeth – a clinical follow-up study

Department of Pediatric Dentistry
Lutheran Medical Center
           
Resident’s Name: Brian Darling                                                                                             Date: 5/10/17
Article Title: Effects of traumatic dental injuries to primary teeth on permanent teeth – a clinical follow-up study
Author(s): de Fatima Guedes de Amorim, L et al
Journal: Dental Traumatology; 27: 117-121
Date: 2011
Major Topic: Developmental sequelae to permanent teeth after trauma to primary teeth
Type of Article: Case control
Main Purpose: This study investigated the association between injuries in primary teeth and the effects on their successors.
Key Points: (2 lines Max):
·      Age at trauma to primary dentition, especially 1-3 years old is associated with developmental sequelae to permanent teeth
·      ~1/4 of trauma to primary dentition is associated with developmental sequelae to permanent dentition with enamel discoloration and hypoplasia being the most common sequelae
·      Trauma to primary dentition increases when children begin to walk
·      Trauma to primary dentition is most often due to falls, most often occurs at home, and maxillary central incisors are the most commonly injured primary teeth
·      Permanent tooth germ is separated from the periapcial region of the primary tooth by a hard tissue barrier that is less than 3mm thick and may only consist of fibrous connective tissue
·      Common developmental sequelae to permanent teeth after primary tooth trauma
o   Enamel discoloration
o   Crown or root dilacerations
o   Odontoma-like formation
o   Tooth-germ sequestration
o   Partial/total interruption of root formation
o   Eruption disorders
·      ~25% of trauma to primary teeth is associated with subsequent developmental sequelae to permanent teeth
·      Discoloration and hypoplasia are the most common developmental sequelae to permanent teeth
·      Trauma from age 1-3 years are most strongly associated with developmental sequelae in permanent teeth
·      Intrusive luxation and avulsions to primary teeth are the injuries most likely to produce developmental sequelae in permanent teeth
·      Repeated trauma to primary teeth does not appear to affect occurrence of complications in permanent teeth
·      Appears to be no association between sequelae to traumatized primary tooth and sequelae to permanent successor
·      Sequelae to permanent tooth appears to be more associated with extent of injury to primary tooth rather than the specific treatment performed on the primary tooth

Remarks:
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2-
Assessment of Article:  Level of Evidence/Comments: II-3


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